How I Was Saved From the Titanic (1912)

The Yesteryear Gazette

(From the San Francisco Call – June 2, 1912)

A Survivor of the Most Dramatic Marine Disaster in the World’s History – Told Exclusively to Readers of the Semi-Monthly Magazine Section

By Charlotte Collyer

R.M.S.  Embarking on Fatal Maiden VoyageOf the many shocking things that I remember in connection with the lost Titanic, there is one impression that will never leave me. It is the irony of the faith that I had in the big ship. “She is unsinkable,” I had been told; “she is the safest boat afloat.” I had never been on an ocean voyage, and I was afraid of the sea. But I listened to the people who said: “Take the new Titanic. She cannot come to any harm. New inventions have made her safe; and then, the officers will be extra careful on her first trip.” That sounded as if it must be true; and so Harvey, my husband, and our…

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From Long Hair to Chewing Gum: Banned in Singapore

When you go to another country, one should study the laws of that country as they may be different than one would expect.

Remember Singapore

What do gongs, long hair and chewing gums have in common?

They were all part of a list of items that were either permanently banned or disallowed in public for a period of time in Singapore. Some banned items contained dangerous elements, while others were associated with excessive contents of sex and violence that challenged the society’s moral standards. Banning of certain publications was common. For example, a Hong Kong comic, popular among Singapore students who would spend their pocket money to buy at the roadside stalls, was banned in 1966 due to its undesirable storyline filled with violence, gangsterism and fantasy.

So other than drugs and gambling, what had been banned in Singapore since the sixties?

Playboy Magazines

As part of the “anti-yellow” drive at the start of 1960, the Playboy magazine and its Playmate calender was officially banned in Singapore. Costing $2.10 per copy, the monthly magazine from Chicago…

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Paul George says his favorite rookie memory was when his coach got fired

Wow!

ProBasketballTalk

The Pacers got off to a dismal start in 2010-11, winning just 17 of their first 44 games under head coach Jim O’Brien before Frank Vogel took over as a midseason replacement.

With Vogel in place, the team finished 20-18 over its last 38 games, an improbable run that landed the Pacers in the playoffs.

All this went down during Paul George’s rookie season, and not surprisingly, he was much happier once Vogel took over and he was inserted into the starting lineup for the remainder of the year, which included five postseason games.

Somewhat ironically, George’s minutes per game were fairly similar under Vogel, but players believe a certain amount of cache is attached to being one of the starters, and there may have been other reasons that…

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Quarterback Competition Begins In Berea And Other Notes From Day 1 Of Training Camp

CBS Cleveland

BEREA (92.3 The Fan) – Neither Brian Hoyer nor Johnny Manziel distinguished himself on the opening day of training camp Saturday, but that’s to be expected.

The day for the 2 ca be summed up succinctly: Hoyer’s throws were crisp and Manziel was mobile.

Head coach Mike Pettine seemed pleased with what he initially saw from both – subject to review on tape.

“I thought they both did some real good things that highlighted what they do well and they both made some mistakes,” Pettine said. “Some of it’s not necessarily their faults, [like] a receiver going the wrong way. I thought it was a solid start for both of them.”

Hoyer participated fully in 11 on 11 work and faced defensive pressure for the first time since tearing his right ACL last October. He handled the pressure like he seems to handle everything else, calmly and with ease.

The…

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What the Television We Watch Can Tell Us About Our Politics

unfettered equality

In 1999, NBC premiered Aaron Sorkin’s new series The West Wing, a television show that follows the life of fictional President Josiah Bartlet and his staff. It was two years before 9/11, and television audiences were enamored by Sorkin’s portrayal of a “utopian” White House. Premiering shortly after the Clinton impeachment, The West Wing debuted during a partisan political climate that split the American electorate. Sorkin’s goal was to humanize the executive branch and combat the cynical beliefs viewers had of politics. He created relatable characters and a President without moral ambiguity, giving audiences an alternative view of public service than what was they saw on the daily news. This optimistic approach definitely became more apparent as the Clinton presidency came to a close and the presidency of George W. Bush began.

Most of The West Wing’s run coincided with the Bush presidency. The turmoil of the Bush years…

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